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International Relations & World Politics

MODULAR ONLINE COURSES BY DISTANCE LEARNING

INTR 301 Politics 1: People and Politics

This course provides a general introduction to politics, defined as the use of state power to make decisions about who gets what, when, and how in a society. It emphasizes the role of the individual in parallel with law, moral codes, and corporate and other collective institutions all of which are involved in political education. The impact of political ideas on family, school and other key socialization processes and institutions will be explored. An analysis of democracy will highlight the relationship of theoretical analysis to practical action with particular reference to recent international social and cultural changes.

INTR 302 The Role of Civil Society

The focus will be on non-state actors in International Relations such as non-governmental organizations, (NGOs), intergovernmental organizations (INGOs), business international non-governmental organizations (BINGOs).The concepts of civic society and pressure groups will be put under the microscope. An important part of the course will be exploring the nature of advocacy and its use in terms of “consultative status” within the United Nations system. Students will be expected to develop their own civic society project.

INTR 303 Mediterranean History

The “West” is a term frequently used in a pejorative manner but what does it really imply? To answer the question, the course will review the relationship of peoples within the Mediterranean region over 3,000 years. It will highlight the role of Greek and Roman civilizations in forming ideas of the “West”. Primary production, trade and communications and the role of the Italian City state in banking will be emphasized to illustrate the importance of the Mediterranean in technological change.

INTR 401 World Political Affairs since 1919

A close examination of the Interwar Years, World War II, the end of Colonialism, the “Cold War” and events subsequent to the Fall of the Berlin Wall. The use of film, videos and recordings of the spoken word will provide key elements in discussion. Students will be expected to think about IR theoretically and demonstrate an ability to analyze policy.

INTR 402 International Organizations

This course will examine the changing nature of international organizations. Originally restricted to those activities concerned with official relations between sovereign states on issues such as war, diplomacy, immigration, and other aspects of interstate negotiations, international organizations now include activities between individuals and groups in one state and individuals and groups in another. The review will cover definitions and history, the classification of organizations and their role and function.

INR 602 Processes and Networks in IR

This course introduces students to collective decision-making in all areas and types of institutions that act across international borders.  This will include decision-making in international organizations, international and multinational businesses, international civil society associations, NGOs, trade unions and environment protection agencies.  The course will cover different methods of collective decision-making and cover voting methods, consensus decision-making, committee decisions, and other forms of participatory models.  In addition, students will also be introduced to methods of stakeholder dialogue, facilitation, diplomatic good offices, mediation, dispute resolution and conflict prevention.  Students will be required to study at least one type of structured collective decision-making.

INT 603 Global Governance – Actors and Interests

The focus of this course will be on how the concept of “global governance” has come into common usage in international relations.  This will include a study of the role that national governments, industry, international organizations and non-governmental actors play in International Relations.  This course will include a study of the concepts of civil society and NGO pressure groups, and examine how businesses and civil society organizations influence global governance along with or through the activities of international organizations.  Students will be expected to carry out research on a specific case study on one or more civil society organizations and the effect it exercises on international relations.

Students will also be expected to work together to develop a virtual NGO project that advocates a shared objective and that is set up according to national and international laws and regulations for non-profit organizations.   The course will also introduce other international actors such as International Governmental Organizations (IGOs), intergovernmental organizations (INGOs) and international business associations that also play a role in international relations.  An important part of the course will be to explore the nature of advocacy and its use in terms of “consultative status” within the United Nations system.

INR 607 North-South Relations and International Development

The great difference in wealth, living standards and quality of life between the countries usually considered as “the less industrialized South” and those labeled as “highly industrialized North” are significant for a comprehensive understanding of international relations.  This course will help students understand the interdependence that exists between these two global regions and how official governmental development assistance and trade affect these relations.  Students will be required study a specific regional dynamic that is either economic (for example: import and export agreements), social (migration and population pressures), or political (cultural exchange agreements, development assistance or humanitarian relief, etc.).

INR 608 International Relations in the Context of Conflict and Peace

This course examines how conflicts of an extreme nature develop between individuals and groups. After an analysis of different theoretical frameworks, the origins of terrorism and genocide are integrated into a model underlying the role of modernity as a catalyst for collective violence. Case studies are developed in the third part of the course. The concluding part pays attention to preventive measures. Students are encouraged to participate actively in the course (debates, readings, research).

POLS 250 Comparative Politics*

This course provides an introductory comparative survey, analyzing the political cultures and systems existing today in the Western World, the former Communist bloc, and the evolving Third World. The course evaluates and compares political ideologies; relations of individuals to the state; participation in the political process; the role of interest groups; pressure groups; and political parties, as well as the policy outcomes of economics and social systems. (This course is recommended for students majoring in the BS in International Business degree).

POLS 273 International Relations*

This course focuses on the foreign policies of the major powers in the world community with an emphasis on the role of the United States in international politics. Principles from many of the social sciences – history, political science, demography, economics, and geography – are used to enable students to develop understanding and stimulate thinking about the international political system and to foster insight into contemporary international experiences. The successes and failures of international organizations in resolving conflicts and negotiating settlements in the current century are stressed with special attention given to the role of the United Nations and to contemporary situations that affect world politics. (This course is recommended for students majoring in the BS in International Business degree).

MGMT 235 International Business*

This course provides students with an understanding of the global economy and its impact on business within the United States. Included are an analysis of the impact of various political systems on business; the effects of culture on business style; the role and size of international trade; the management of multinational corporations; the impact of trade restraints and liberalization; and balancing legal, political, and ethical issues in international business techniques. Students are introduced to the concept of international business management by studying cultural influences, trade relations, labor agreements, government, international finance and business structures in the global economy. The course also explores decision-making within a competitive context. Course Prerequisite: Introduction to Management, Principles of Economics

MGMT 218 International Economics*

This course prepares students to understand the basics of international trade and finance and the effects of various international economic policies on domestic and world welfare. The course will highlight sources of comparative advantage, gains and losses from trade, the impact of trade on economic growth, and effects of trade policy interventions such as tariffs, quotas, voluntary export restraints, and export subsidies. International agreements on regional trade liberalization (such as ECU and NAFTA) and on multilateral trade liberalization will be discussed. Topics on international finance will include balance of payments, determination of foreign exchange rates, and international monetary system.

CIM Business Economics for a Global Market

The course deals with important economic issues that impact on business in a world that has become increasingly market-oriented and internationally integrated (‘globalized’). The content of the course can be classified under three main headings: 1) Microeconomic factors – including demand and supply analysis, costs and incentives, the role of competition policy, the persistence of oligopoly and monopolistic competition, privatization and the economics of the environment. 2) Macroeconomic factors – aggregate output and the cyclical patterns in GDP and national income, the factors that determine; employment, the commitment to price stability and implications for monetary policy, prices, interest and exchange rates, the conduct of fiscal policy given the upcoming challenges of ageing population and rising debt. 3) International factors – trade theory and trade policy, implications of trade liberalization, the role of the WTO and institutions, regional trade agreements, international finance and global capital markets, current global imbalances and implications for exchange rates. Learning Outcomes: attention will be given to the major challenges and opportunities for business arising from the growth of emerging market economies. This has significant implications for the transfer of jobs and production in developed economies. A theme of the course is the need for a strategic response on the part of the individual firm, the industry and the government to meet these challenges. The worldwide movement towards knowledge-based activities in response to the pressure of global competition will be analyzed. A series of current articles and examples taken from academic, financial and business sources will be used.

MGMT 303 International Business Management*

This course provides a survey of international business management in the context of the increasing economic interdependence of nations. Theories of international business are examined in conjunction with strategic planning, intercultural factors, foreign management techniques, and political risk analysis. The activities of multinational enterprises in home and host countries are also examined.

MGMT 420 International Banking and Finance*

This is a course designed to give the student an overview of international banking and finance. Topics covered include the international dimensions of finance, foreign exchange rates, international sources of funds, international banking regulations, and the contrast between European, Asian, and American Banking.

MGMT 215 International Political Economy*

International political economy is an integrated field that encompasses the discipline of political, economics, and international relations. This course provides an integrated approach to the study of international economic relations with reference to issues and policies as well as to political philosophies and competing ideologies. Major themes are international monetary management, the political economy of international trade, multinational corporations, and development issues. (Prerequisite for students majoring in the BS International degree). Prerequisite ECON201

MGT 518 International Economics

This course prepares students to understand the basics of international trade and finance and the effects of various international economic policies on domestic and world welfare. The course will highlight sources of comparative advantage, gains and losses from trade, the impact of trade on economic growth, and effects of trade policy interventions such as tariffs, quotas, voluntary export restraints, and export subsidies. International agreements on regional trade liberalization (such as ECU and NAFTA) and on multilateral trade liberalization will be discussed. Topics on international finance will include balance of payments, determination of foreign exchange rates, and international monetary system.

MCO 606 – International and Development Communications

This course is divided into two parts: the development, rule and future of globalized media (especially transnational media institutions), and the role that communication technology plays in international development. We will explore transnational media institutions and the conditions under which they have been used by the state and private capital. The role of international communication as presented by several well-known authors from South Asia, East Asia, Europe, and North America will be examined. Modules 4-6 will focus on development communication applications by various active researchers and professors, drawn from Latin America, South Asia, and North America. Such issues to be addressed in the class include the New World Information and Communication Order (NWICO), cultural imperialism, the role of the Internet in development communications, transnational advertising, the global-local dialectic, development communication campaigns, communication technology and development. In addition, such topics as freedom of the press, the relationship of the press to national development, post-colonial media and development, globalization and the role of the media, cultural concerns, and international broadcasting, and the role of communication in international development, will be covered. Prerequisites: Students must have completed two upper-level undergraduate courses each in media and communications, or journalism. Course on Theory of Mass Communication and Culture recommended.


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